Eggs

Eggcellent Traditions I know you'll love for Easter!

Easter is my absolute favorite holiday!

It outweighs even Christmas as far as my enjoyment goes.

I love that it falls in the spring season (even if Michigan still has snow on the ground- yes, it happens.)

I love putting together colorful baskets of goodies for my kids, dying eggs, Easter egg hunts and family dinner served on my mom’s good china.

But more important than what we do, to celebrate, is the reason my family celebrates.

The day marks the resurrection of Jesus Christ. An action that completes God’s gift of salvation, free for us to receive. It is a joyous occasion of freedom worth a celebration.

Just like my family gathers around the table at Christmas to frost cookies, we also gather around the table the day before Easter to dye eggs.

We do it the old fashioned way. The way I grew up doing it.

colored-colorful-decoration-364824.jpg

Dying Eggs

My mom could never see the sense in purchasing a pricey egg dying kit when we had the ability to do it with what we had at home.

  • Mugs

  • Spoons

  • Food Dye

  • Vinegar

  • Hard-boiled eggs (room temp.)

  • Rags

  • Egg cartons

We simply filled the mugs with boiling water, added a Tbsp. of vinegar to each mug and then added a few drops of food dye to each mug. We placed eggs on spoons and lowered them into the mug, where they would sit until the desired color was reached. After we took them out of the mug, they rested on rags (or paper towel) to dry. Then they went back into the cartons and were stored away in the fridge until it was time for the egg hunt.

When my husband entered the picture, we got even more creative.

  • Sharpies of various sizes

  • clear nail polish

Sharpies allow you to draw extra (or should I say eggstra… hahaha) details and designs on your eggs. Use fine and regular tips to allow you the most creativity.

Our favorite way to use sharpies is our traditional Charlie Brown egg. Using a black sharpie draw a chevron stripe design on an egg and then place it in a mug of yellow food coloring. The result is an egg that looks like Charlie Brown’s shirt.

Clear nail polish lets you write and design secret messages on your eggs that won’t show up until you put them in dye. We like to write names and draw symbols, shapes and pictures before placing them in the colors.

After the festivities of egg hunting are done, my favorite way to use up our decorated hard-boiled eggs is as Deviled Eggs.

appetizer-cuisine-dairy-product-273765.jpg

History Lesson

The term deviled was first used, in reference to food, in 1786. (Though stuffed eggs were a favorite since ancient Rome.) In the 1800’s it was used for spicy or zesty food, including eggs, that were prepared with mustard, pepper and other ingredients.

In 1896, Fannie Farmer was one of the earliest to suggest the use of mayonnaise in regards to the filling, though that did not become the classic combination until the 1940’s.

Today there are many recipes for fillings that use everything from pickles, bacon, seafood, and hot sauce to kimchi and caviar.

My family’s favorite is a simple, basic recipe from Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book. (A classic that I received as a wedding shower gift, twenty five years ago, and still use to this day.) Deviled eggs from this recipe are always the first to disappear at any function we bring them to.

Deviled Eggs Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 6 hard boiled Fox & Glove Farmstead eggs

  • 1/4 cup mayo

  • 1 tsp. dijon mustard

  • 1 tsp. vinegar

  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Paprika for dusting

Instructions:

  • Halve the cooked eggs lengthwise, remove yolks.

  • Place yolks in a bowl and mash with a fork.

  • Add mayo, mustard, and vinegar and mix well.

  • Season with salt and pepper.

  • Stuff the egg halves with the yolk mixture and dust with paprika. (You can simply drop filling into the yolk cavity by spoon or get fancy and use a piping bag to fill your eggs.)

I have a few final tips that will make working with your eggs easier on both egg dying and prepping days.

  1. Bring the eggs to room temp. for both boiling and dying eggs. Don’t use cold, straight from the fridge eggs.

  2. Use older eggs… they’ll be easier to peel.

  3. Do use a good dose of salt in your water when you boil your eggs… they’ll be easier to peel this way as well.

I hope you enjoy your Easter Holiday and find these tips useful! If you have any egg tips or tricks I’d love if you’d share them with me. Leave a comment below or email me at cyndi@foxandglovefarmstead.com and don’t forget to sign up for your free gift from Fox & Glove Farmstead down below in the footer.

Also if you are local to the Grand Rapids, Michigan area we’d love to be your supplier of farm fresh eggs.

Until next time,

Bloom & Grow,

Cyndi